KIRK & SWEENEY

Dominican Rum

Kirk & Sweeney was a wooden schooner, best known for smuggling rum from the Caribbean to the Northeast during the early years of Prohibition. In 1924, it was seized off the coast of New York with a massive amount of rum aboard. The schooner was subsequently renamed “Chase” and pressed into duty as a Coast Guard trainer, serving until the late 1940’s when it was retired and salvaged. 
Handcrafted in the Dominican Republic, this rum adheres to the very strict regulations to be called “Dominican Rum”. The process begins with hand harvested, high quality sugarcane that is pure. The byproduct of the sugarcane, “Blackstrap Molasses” is then carefully ferment- ed and distilled. The average ageing of rum in the Caribbean is generally two years, Kirk and Sweeney is the rare exception.

The bottle and the raised cork were inspired by the elegantly squat 18th-century onion bottles, which typically contained rum. These beautiful bottles were sometimes encased with hemp netting which could be used as a handle or to hang the bottle from a ship beam. Playing off the concept of global navigation, an antique nautical map of the main rum smuggling route is silkscreened around the circumference of the bottle.
The neck features a photo of Kirk and Sweeney and a Coast Guard styled citation with the batch and bottle number. Along with the ornate logo and the safety seal printed to look like nautical brass, the design serves as a reminder of the risk so many were willing to take for a good taste of rum during the 1920’s.